A Partnership with Evil

This is from 2 Chronicles 16; 1 Kings 22:1-40; 2 Chronicles 18:1 – 19:3; 1 Kings 22:48-49; 2 Chronicles 20:35-37)

King Asa of Judah was a great King. He was overall deemed right by God. However, he made some mistakes too. First off, he went and formed an alliance with the evil King of Syria, the infamous Behadad, to fight off the evil king of Israel. He doesn’t consult God, who had previously helped him in a more grievous situation earlier involving the Ethiopians (Not consulting God is a recipe for disaster. See entry on September 20th, 2014.) This worked, though it did involve taking some things from the Temple. God, however, isn’t amused and sends a prophet to tell Asa off and that because of his disobedience (God had planned to get rid of Benhadad and Asa’s alliance with him had hampered this.) , the rest of his reign would be marred by war.
Asa, however, gets mad the prophet and has him thrown in jail and harasses any sympathizers of the prophet guy. Later, Asa would get a foot disease, but would not consult God, but only his doctors.
Asa’s bad habit of making alliances with the wrong sort would be passed on, and worse, to his son Jehoshaphat.

Jehoshaphat continued his father’s godly reign. However, he also continued his father’s bad habit of making alliances with bad men.

He was skilled as a diplomat. However, one of those moves, which he must not have consulted God on or ignored Him if he did, was his marriage of his son Jehoram (who would NOT continue in the godly ways of his father and grandfather before him) to the evil daughter of Ahab, Athaliah (who, though who knows, as polygamy wasn’t that uncommon in that time period, was may have been a daughter of Jezebel, and seems to have inherited her charm if so). This would prove disastrous for his family. Athaliah would drag down his son (and do some other things later like seize the throne for herself and kill lots of peoples, you know, evil queen stuff.) .

Later, Jehoshaphat makes another mistake. He decides to aid with Ahab against Syria (You know, the same Syria that his father made an alliance with earlier. The one that God wanted to defeat. That Syria.) Ahab decides to have Jehoshaphat ride in his chariot (so the bad guys will mistake Jehoshaphat for him. Some friend Ahab is!!!). The godly king gets in a pinch and calls out to God. The bad guys realize “Hey, Ahab is a big Baal man, this can’t be him!” and they go elsewhere. So, his faith in God saves him. (There’s a lesson in that.) Ahab is defeated by the Syrians anyway, despite his disguise.

Jehoshaphat does a lot of good things, including having a national day of prayer to help save Judah from an invasion. However, he also seems to have formed another partnership with ungodly men. He worked with the evil King Ahaziah (Ahab’s son) on a shipping trade venture. A prophet told the King of Judah that the ships would be lost (which they indeed were). Ahaziah asked to rebuild and try again, but, thankfully, the King of Judah wisely declined.

Later, he would help in the Moabite rebellion campaign. His presence there helped get the three kings in alliance against Moab the help of Elisha, as Jehoshaphat respected God, and the King of Israel and King of Edom didn’t. Elisha said that he was helping them only because Jehoshaphat was there (evil men can sometimes be blessed if a man of God is there.) . They were able to get victory over Moab. (Ironically, Edom itself would later break away, just as a side note.)

Jehoshaphat was indeed a godly king. However, his partnerships would evil men (particularly him having his son wed to the house of Ahab) would greatly damage the godly legacy of his family, with his son and grandson becoming evil kings (not to mention his daughter-in-law seizing the throne by force and causing a mess.) . May we be careful whom we associate with.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s